Is Your Injury Really an Injury? Guest Post – Matthew Evan Brackney, DC, ATC – Sports Injury Specialist

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Today I have a guest post from my friend and colleague, Matthew Evan Brackney, DC, ATC of Spine & Sports Injury Therapy in Kingwood, TX. Dr. Matthew and I had an opportunity to work together this year and collaborate on the importance of good nutrition to help patience prevent and recover from injury.

Proper nutrition fuels the body and makes the body able to work properly and also to recover properly when it becomes injured. Dr. Matthew said that it is important for his clients to understand the relationship between proper nutrition and chiropractic care and he submitted this information for my followers to read today.

Injuries seem like they would be a simple medical scenario. Someone steps off a curb wrong and sprains their ankle. Or, someone starts getting back into running and has developed hip pain. But, often the pain could just be a symptom of an underlying cause. It seems reasonable that hip pain after running is simply a tendinosus or overuse injury, but what if the tissue has been unable to adapt to a normal amount of increased stress (running) and has subsequently lead to micro-damage (essential what tendinosus is) instead of tissue adaptation and growth (getting stronger)?

Sometimes people’s injuries are not actually the problem, they are just the result of some underlying dysfunction. In essence, their injury isn’t an injury. For years our medical paradigm has “siloed” the human body and its physiology. You have cardiologists, neurologists, pulmonologists, orthopedics, endocrinology, otolaryngology and many others who specialize in one particular element of human anatomy, physiology, and medicine. The truth is, these body systems cannot be disentangled. They are extremely integrated. This point is not difficult to get across. Did you know that our intestines has an aggregation of tissue that creates/matures white blood cells, that is essentially a factory for our immune system in our intestines. In addition, did you know that our Kidneys and our Lungs team up to make sure that blood pressure is at a healthy balance?

In the same way, our muscles and joints require certain hormones, enzymes, vitamins, minerals, all to be working correctly so that our musculoskeletal system can function the way it was designed. Adrenaline (or epinephrine) is released by our adrenal glands (they sit on top of our kidneys) to help convert stored glycogen into usable glucose for muscle fuel while we are exercising. This process is very important for us during exercise to be able to access the fuel that we have stored up.

Simply put, an engine, no matter how nice and new, will still need the right type and amount of oil and gasoline to function. So when evaluating injuries, especially “chronic overuse” type injuries, one cannot ignore the possible connection with the biochemical makeup of the patient.

Did you also know that low vitamin D status has been associated with chronic low back pain. Or an inappropriate Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratio can leave people prone to excessive inflammation. In addition, inappropriately low levels of B12 can lead to peripheral neuropathy (numbness/tingling in feet and hands). Low Co-Q10 levels can lead to whole body muscle fatigue and muscle achiness! The list unfortunately goes on. You can see how common those symptoms/conditions are and how essential it is for a doctor to be savvy enough to consider them when evaluating patients.

The doctors of the future will become increasingly good at blending and understanding the complex integration of our bodies physiology, biochemistry, and biomechanics. Integrative methods are needed for integrated dysfunction.

Thank you, Dr. Matthew, for your perspective and for being an advocate for proper nutrition and the correlation between chiropractic care and integrative health coaching. Keep doing what you do! You can reach Dr. Matthew at the Spine & Sports Therapy location in Kingwood, TX and at www.fixmysportsinjury.com

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