Delicious Thanksgiving Cookie Recipe

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It has been a while since I have posted a recipe as I have been caught up in some other projects the last couple of months, so I am sorry to have been a slacker on that front! Today, I needed to make something for my husband to take to work to a Thanksgiving Potluck Dinner they are doing for the staff tomorrow. In addition to my famous Spinach Balls, I was to make a dessert and decided on a pumpkin cookie.

I’m not one to create a lot of recipes on my own but I love to modify others that I find to make them gluten free and dairy free. This recipe I found on Allrecipes.com and this was developed by Gina. I made it with Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Baking Flour and with organic coconut milk (instead of regular milk) and Earth Balance spread (instead of butter). I hope you love them!

Iced Pumpkin Cookies (made gluten free/dairy free)

2 1/2 cups Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Baking flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup Earth Balance soy spread, softened (can use real butter)

1 1/2 cups organic cane sugar
1 cup canned pumpkin puree
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups confectioners’ sugar
3 tablespoons coconut milk (can use real milk)
1 tablespoon melted Earth Balance
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon Allspice

Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, ground cloves, and salt; set aside.

In a medium bowl, cream together the 1/2 cup of butter and white sugar. Add pumpkin, egg, and 1 teaspoon vanilla to butter mixture, and beat until creamy. Mix in dry ingredients. Drop on cookie sheet by tablespoonfuls; flatten slightly.
Bake for 15 to 20 minutes in the preheated oven. Cool cookies, then drizzle glaze with fork.
To Make Glaze: Combine confectioners’ sugar, milk, 1 tablespoon melted butter,allspice and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Add milk as needed, to achieve drizzling consistency.

The cookies are light and airy and have a subtle pumpkin flavor to them. Can leave the icing off completely if you want to eliminate that sugar element as they are delicious naked and would be great with a hot cup of tea! ENJOY…

World Diabetes Day

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Started by the International Diabetes Foundation back in 1991, World Diabetes Day was created in response to the growing concern about diabetes and about the health threats posed by the disease. Coincidentally, today is also the birthday of Frederick Banting who discovered insulin back in 1921.

Did you know that 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) had diabetes in 2012 and those numbers continue to grow. Of those, approximately 1.25 million had Type 1 diabetes. One in two adults with diabetes are undiagnosed. It is of vital importance to screen for diabetes if you have any of the risk factors and screening is at the forefront of the World Diabetes Day campaign to ensure early diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes and to help reduce the serious complications that can arise from this disease.

So what is the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes? For those with Type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, which eventually eliminates the production of insulin from the body completely. When a person does not have insult, cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose) which they need to produce energy. This type has often been called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes. It accounts for somewhere between 5-10 in 100 people who have the disease.

In Type 2 diabetes, often called adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes, this form of diabetes usually manifests during adulthood but can develop at any age. About 95 of 100 people with diabetes have Type 2. What this means is that a person’s body can no longer use insulin the right way which is also called insulin resistance. If Type 2 progresses and gets worse, a person’s pancreas makes less and less insulin, also called insulin deficiency.

The real difference between the two is that Type 1 diabetes is not preventable. You either have it or you don’t. Type 2 diabetes, can be prevented and/or reversed by eating heathy foods, exercising regularly and living a healthy lifestyle. The sad news about Type 2 diabetes is that more and more children are being diagnosed every year and much can be attributed to eating junk food in large amounts and having a mainly sedentary lifestyle. Time to focus people!

There are several similar consequences to having both types of diabetes and they all stem from possible complications from the disease. If diabetes is not managed on a daily basis, it can ultimately lead to blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke and potential limb amputation.

It may be natural to think that you must stop eating all forms of sugar when you have diabetes or to prevent diabetes but that is not the case. You have to be smart about how much sugar you take in each day and what kind of sugar you are eating.

Here are some foods to fill up on:

Healthy fats from raw nuts, olive oil, fish oils, flax seeds, whole milk dairy, or avocados

Fruits and vegetables—ideally fresh, the more colorful the better; whole fruit rather than juices

High-fiber cereals and breads made from whole grains or legumes

Fish and shellfish, organic, free-range chicken or turkey

High-quality protein such as eggs, beans, milk, cheese, and unsweetened yogurt

Here are foods to eat less of or to avoid:

Trans-fats from partially hydrogenated or deep-fried foods

Packaged and fast foods, especially those high in sugar, baked goods, sweets, chips, desserts

White bread, sugary cereals, refined pastas or rice

Processed meat and red meat from animals fed with antibiotics, growth hormones, and GMO feed

Low-fat products that have replaced fat with added sugar, such as fat-free yogurt

It is also important to pay attention to the Glycemic Index (GI) of particular foods. Wikipedia defines the Glycemic Index as:

The glycemic index or glycaemic index (GI) is a number associated with a particular type of food that indicates the food’s effect on a person’s blood glucose (also called blood sugar) level. A value of 100 represents the standard, an equivalent amount of pure glucose.[1]

The GI represents the total rise in a person’s blood sugar level following consumption of the food; it may or may not represent the rapidity of the rise in blood sugar. The steepness of the rise can be influenced by a number of other factors, such as the quantity of fat eaten with the food. The GI is useful for understanding how the body breaks down carbohydrates[2] and only takes into account the available carbohydrate (total carbohydrate minus fiber) in a food. Although the food may contain fats and other components that contribute to the total rise in blood sugar, these effects are not reflected in the GI.

A good dietary guidelines to follow may include the Mediterraean Diet and those close to that. If you would like more information on how to eat to either reverse or prevent diabetes, contact me at 832-777-6669 or heidismith@integrativewellnessstudio.net and I will create a customized program to meet your goals and needs.